Cemeteries in the Ypres Salient, Belgium

Cemeteries in the Ypres Salient

The battlefields of the Ypres Salient today contain the resting place of many thousands of soldiers of different nationalities who died during the WW1 battles around the town of Ieper (or Ypres as it was then known). At the end of the First World War there were many hundreds of military burial grounds. They ranged in size from large cemeteries located in or near a village or town which had been behind the old Front Lines to small groups of battlefield burials and individual plots.

Bedford House Cemetery, south of Ypres.
Bedford House Cemetery, south of Ypres.

The Ypres sector had seen the best part of four years of trench warfare fighting concentrated into a narrow area of ground to the north, east and south of the town of Ypres. As a result, many thousands had died in the daily grind of “Tours of Trenches” or in an attack on the enemy line.

After the war the battlefields were cleared and the graves in many of the small burial grounds were reinterred into larger cemeteries or so-called ‘collecting’ or ‘concentration’ cemeteries. The land on which the British and Commonwealth cemeteries are located has been given in gratitude by the Belgian nation. The Ypres Salient area now contains the resting place of many thousands of soldiers and airmen in over 100 British and Commonwealth military cemeteries, one German, two French and one Belgian military cemetery.

List and Locations of Ypres Salient Cemeteries

The listing below gives the modern-day Flemish spelling of a village or town, followed by the 1914-1918 French spelling in brackets where it was different at that time. Registers providing the place of burial or commemoration of First World War casualty can be searched via the link to our pages on the various war grave agencies provided at the foot of this page.

In the list below click icon to click for location on the map to show the place on the map or icon to click for expanding listing details to expand the details.

  • 1st D.C.L.I. Cemetery, The Bluff, Zillebeke

    50.82088025951577

    2.912990301847458

    The cemetery contains the remains of 76 First World War burials, 63 of whom are identified. The majority of the graves are those of the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (D.C.L.I.), who died in action at this place from April to July 1915. This is the reason for the name given to the cemetery. Other graves were brought into the cemetery after the war from individual plots or small groups of graves in the surrounding area.
  • Abeele Aerodrome Military Cemetery, Watou

    50.81537751634311

    2.657272517681122

    The cemetery takes its name from the airfield used by Allied forces which was located close by. The burials were begun in April 1918 by French troops. There were 84 American burials in the cemetery, buried between July and September 1918. After the Armistice the French and American graves were removed. There are now 104 Commonwealth burials, all of whom are identified.
  • Aeroplane Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.86373119095672

    2.931080460548401

    The cemetery was started by the 15th Division and the 16th (Irish) Division in August 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). At the start of the British offensive on 31st July 1917 the site of the cemetery was in No-Mans-Land. After the British troops gained ground in their initial successful advance on the German positions here, this location then lay behind the British front line. Originally the cemetery was called New Cemetery, Frezenberg but within a few weeks it became known as Aeroplane Cemetery because there was he wreck of a crashed plane close to the original graves. The crashed plane was in the place where the Cross of Sacrifice is now located at the far end of the cemetery. After the war burials from the surrounding area and two small burial sites (20 graves from Bedford House Cemetery Enclosure No. 5, Zillebeke; 23 graves including 2 German from Lock 8 Cemetery, Voormezele) were reinterred in Aeroplane Cemetery, bringing the total number of burials of Commonwealth servicemen to 1,105 buried here. 469 of these burials are identified.
  • Artillery Wood Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.89945597296839

    2.872197926044464

    Artillery Wood Cemetery near Boezinge (Boesinghe).
    Artillery Wood Cemetery near Boezinge.

    The location of Artillery Wood cemetery was behind the German front line at the start of the British offensive on 31st July 1917, the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). The early part of the offensive here was known as the Battle of Pilckem Ridge. Successfully gaining ground on this eastern side of the Ypres-Yser (Ieper-Ijzer) canal, the Guards Division pushed the German front line eastwards, capturing the ground where the cemetery is located. Burials were interred in the cemetery from that time and it continued to be used until the German spring offensive of March 1918. By the end of the war there were 141 graves here, 42 of which were artillerymen who had died in the gun positions near here. After the war more graves were brought into the cemetery and the total graves are now 1,307. Of these 801 are identified burials.

    Lance Corporal Francis Ledwidge

    Headstone of Lance Corporal Francis Ledwidge in Artillery Wood Cemetery.
    Headstone of Lance Corporal Francis Ledwidge in Artillery Wood Cemetery.

    The Irish poet Francis Ledwidge is buried in this cemetery in Plot II, Row B, Grave 5. He was serving with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers when he died on 31st July 1917, the day of the launch of the British offensive the Third Battle of Ypres. He died at the crossroads just south of the cemetery and was brought into the cemetery together with the bodies of four of his comrades who also died that day. The graves of the fellow Iniskilling Fusiliers are buried near to Ledwidge and are Lance Serjeant Harte (grave reference II.D.20); Private Evans (grave reference II.D.10); Private Mattingley (grave reference II.E.14); Private Robert Sharman (grave reference II.D.4.).

    Memorial to Francis Ledwidge
  • Bard Cottage Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.876360029861566

    2.868525981903076

    The cemetery was begun in June 1915 and used until October 1918. Casualties buried here include servicemen from 49th (West Riding) Division and 38th (Welsh) Division. The original cemetery was expanded in size after the First World War with graves brought in from the surrounding area including 32 graves from the nearby burial site at Marengo Farm Cemetery. There are 1,639 burials in the cemetery, of which 1,603 are identified. The name of the cemetery is taken from Bard Cottage, a house located near the cemetery on the other side of the Ypres-Boesinghe road, between the road and the Ypres-Yser (Ieper-Ijzer) Canal.
  • Bedford House Cemetery

    50.8285999978371

    2.890525460243225

    Bedford House Cemetery

    Bedford House Cemetery.
    Bedford House Cemetery.
    Bedford House cemetery was the location of the Château Rosendal and its parkland with moats, trees and buildings. There are over 5,000 First World War Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. Bedford House cemetery is one of the largest British and Commonwealth cemeteries in the Ypres Salient.
  • Belgian Battery Corner Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.83899194849244

    2.861833870410919

    The name of the cemetery comes from the fact that in 1915 there were three Belgian artillery batteries located at this place. One burial on this site is for a Canadian Private F Mees of the 14th Battalion Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment), who died on 28th November 1916 (grave reference Plot III, Row A, Grave 5). The rest of the graves date from June 1917 and the British offensive of the Battle of Messines when the 8th Division was in the area. The cemetery was in use until October 1918. Many of the burials are for artillerymen serving with the artillery units located in the area nearby. The cemetery contains the remains of 573 casualties, of whom 566 are identified.
  • Berks Cemetery Extension, Ploegsteert

    50.73820515379541

    2.882114052772522

    Berks Cemetery Extension

    Graves of the Berks Cemetery Extension with the sculpted lion for the Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing in the foreground.
    Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing sculpted lion.

    There are 876 First World War burials in Berks Cemetery Extension.

    The Ploegsteert Memorial to the Missing is located in this cemetery.

  • Bethleem Farm East Cemetery, Mesen (Messines)

    50.760850789205996

    2.911307215690613

    There are 36 identified casualties buried in the cemetery, all but one of whom are from units serving with the Australian Infantry. Burials were started here from 8th June 1917 after the nearby Bethleem Farm was captured by the 3rd Australian Division during the first day of the Battle of Messines on 7th June. One casualty is a Machine Gunner buried in September of that year. There is a special memorial to 8 casualties who are unidentified and one casualty who is identified but only known to be buried in the vicinity of the cemetery.
  • Bethleem Farm West Cemetery, Mesen (Messines)

    50.75874508045928

    2.9066884517669678

    The cemetery was started by the 3rd Australian Division after the first day of the Battle of Messines on 7th June 1917. It was originally known to the Australians as 3rd Division General Cemetery. After the June battle it was used by 14th (Light) Division until late September 1917. There are 165 First World War servicemen and one identified Second World War serviceman buried here.
  • Birr Cross Roads Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.84743318257584

    2.928631603717804

    The cemetery was begun in August 1917 after the launch of the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele) on 31st July 1917. It was named by the 1st Leinsters. It was used as a Dressing Station cemetery from that time. At the end of the war the graves in the cemetery were mostly those of the now Plot I. After the war burials were brought here from the surrounding area and from small cemeteries, namly Bellewaarde Ridge Military Cemetery, Birr Cross Roads Cemetery No. 2, and Union Street Graveyards No. 1 and No. 2. There are 833 servicemen of the Commonwealth buried in the cemetery now, of whom 498 are identified.

    Captain Harold Ackroyd, VC, MC

    The first name to be listed in the cemetery register is that of Captain Harold Ackroyd, who died on 11th August 1917. He was serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, attached to the 6th Battalion the Berkshire Regiment when he was killed in action. He was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry in tending to the wounded at that time. His name appears on one of the special memorials in this cemetery as he is believed to be buried here, but the exact location of his body is not known.

  • Blauwepoort Farm Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.829304439588036

    2.9081301391124725

    The cemetery is located at Blauwepoort Farm. It was begun by the French Army in November 1914 and subsequently used by Commonwealth forces from February 1915 to February 1916. After the war the French graves were removed. There are 82 identified First World War casualties in the cemetery.
  • Bleuet Farm Cemetery, Elverdinge (Elverdinghe)

    50.88898702640627

    2.831675112247467

    The cemetery was begun in June 1917 when the farm was the location of a dressing station from the time of the preparations for the Allied offensive offensive on the German line on 31st July 1917, the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). It remained in use until December 1917. There are 442 First World War graves in the cemetery and 9 Second World War graves. The number of identified casualties is 451.
  • Brandhoek Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.853153519890455

    2.7910664677619934

    Brandhoek Military Cemetery was the first of three cemeteries to be used in the village. Brandhoek was the location of field ambulances for most of the war. It was at a relatively safe distance from the range of German artillery and was also situated on the main road and the railway line from Ypres to Poperinge. For this reason it was a good position for medical units to receive wounded soldiers from the front lines, treat them where possible and send them by road or by rail to Poperinge. From there they could be evacuated by rail to the base hospitals in France, such as Boulogne on the French coast. Brandhoek Military Cemetery was begun in May 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres. The cemetery was closed in July 1917 after the New Military Cemetery No. 3 was opened from August 1917. The cemetery contains 669 First World War burials. All but three of these are identified as they died of wounds here at the medical dressing stations.
  • Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.85299005917685

    2.788333296775818

    This cemetery was the second to be started in Brandhoek village. It was begun from 31st July 1917, the opening day of the Allied offensive which was to be the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). Many of the 530 First World War burials died of wounds in the Casualty Clearing Stations based here (32nd, 3rd Australian and 44th C.C.S.) in the first weeks of August 1917. There are also 28 German war graves in the cemetery.

    Captain Noel Godfrey Chavasse, VC and Bar, MC

    One of the many young officers to die of his wounds here was Captain Noel Chavasse, VC and Bar, MC. He is buried in grave reference Plot III, Row B, Grave 15.

  • Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, No. 3, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.85194019416455

    2.7878719568252563

    The Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No. 3 was the third of the three cemeteries at Brandhoek to be opened. It was begun in August 1917 and was in use until May 1918. There are 975 First World War burials in the cemetery, all but two of whom are identified.
  • Bridge House Cemetery, Langemark (Langemarck)

    50.879416066441756

    2.936924993991852

    The cemetery was named after the farm house located here. It was begun by the 59th (North Midland) Division at the end of September 1917 during the Battle of Polygon Wood. The cemetery contains burials for 45 First World War servicemen, four of whom are unidentified.
  • Buffs Road Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.87662089404271

    2.9164516925811768

    The cemetery takes its name from the lane on which it is located, which was named Buffs Road. The cemetery was used between July 1917 and March 1918. Burials are from units including 12th, 13th and 14th Royal Sussex and the Royal Artillery. Some graves were brought into the cemetery after the end of the war, including the identified remains of Corporal S Watters of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) who died on 22nd October 1914. There are 289 burials or commemorations from the First World War in the cemetery. 86 of these burials are unidentified. Of these 10 are commemorated here because their graves in this cemetery were destroyed by artillery fire.
  • Bus House Cemetery, Voormezele (Vormezeele)

    50.81297440286028

    2.8869447112083435

    The cemetery was named after the nearby farm house named Bus House. The cemetery dates from June to November 1917. There are 206 First World War burials and 12 of these are unidentified. There are also 79 casualties from the Second World War buried here. Two French war graves are also in the cemetery.
  • Buttes New British Cemetery, Polygon Wood, Zonnebeke

    50.85577806983614

    2.991781532764435

  • Cabin Hill Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wijtschaete)

    50.77391071784413

    2.904915511608124

    There are 67 First World War burials in the cemetery. The burials were started here by 11th Division in June 1917 during the Battle of Messines. Burials include a number of soldiers serving with the Australian Infantry. The cemetery continued to be used until March 1918.
  • Calvaire (Essex) Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.71865385183035

    2.8988054394721985

    The cemetery takes its name from the building next to the cemetery known as Essex House. The cemetery was started in November 1914 ny the 2nd Essex and 2nd Monmouthshire Regiments. It was then used by various regiments serving in this sector until July 1916, including 9th Royal Fusiliers, 11th Middlesex Regiment, 7th Suffolk Regiment, 9th Essex Regiment, 6th Buffs, 1/7th and 1/8th Worcestershire Regiment, 11th Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, 10th Royal West Kent Regiment. The cemetery fell into German occupied territory from April to September 1918 following the German spring offensive. There are 218 First World War burials, all of whom are identified.
  • Canada Farm Cemetery, Elverdinge (Elverdinghe)

    50.88825607477089

    2.782236635684967

    The cemetery was named after the farm here which was used as a dressing station during the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). There are 907 burials in the cemetery, most of whom died between June and September 1917.
  • Cement House Cemetery, Langemark (Langemarck)

    50.904671409053364

    2.9071886837482452

    The name of the cemetery was taken from a fortified farm called Cement House, which was located on the Langemark-Boezinge road. The cemetery was started in August 1917 and continued to be used until April 1918. The original cemetery consisted of 231 graves in what is now Plot I. After the Armistice graves were brought into the cemetery and the burials now total 3,592. 1,184 are identified.
  • Chester Farm Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.821348271763696

    2.9015976190567017

    The name of the cemetery is taken from the farm called Chester Farm by the British forces. The cemetery was in use from March 1915 to November 1917. There are 420 Commonwealth servicemen buried in this cemetery, five of whom are unidentified and two of whom are commemorated in the cemetery. The burials include 92 officers and men of the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment, who were killed between April and July 1915. 72 burials are for men of the London Regiment.
  • Colne Valley Cemetery, Boesinge

    50.885188772880355

    2.878075987100601

    The name of the cemetery is taken from the name of a trench called Colne Valley so called by the 49th (West Riding) Division. The cemetery was started in July 1915 and remained in use until February 1916. There are 47 burials, 30 of whom are officers and men of the West Riding Regiment.
  • Croonaert Chapel Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.79992334933255

    2.8731299936771393

    The cemetery was named after a shrine on the Voormezele-Wijtschate road. The cemetery was started by 19th Division in June 1917 during the Battle of Messines. It was used until November 1917. There are 75 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. Seven graves are unidentified. There were 51 German graves located in the cemetery by the end of the war. These graves were removed after the end of the war.
  • Dadizeele New British Cemetery

    50.849071232815085

    3.088763505220413

    The civilian cemetery at Dadizele contains 27 burials from the First World War. The burials are all dating from October 1918 when the 36th (Ulster) Division and 9th Scottish Division reached the village during the autumn in the last few weeks of the war. There are also two unidentified French graves and two unidentified Second World War burials in the cemetery.
  • Derry House Cemetery No. 2, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.84871346109429

    2.9004523158073425

    The cemetery takes its name from the name of the farm where it was located, called “Derry House” by the soldiers of the Royal Irish Rifles. There was a No. 1 cemetery, but this no longer exists since the graves were removed after the war. Derry House Cemetery No. 2 was started by the field ambulance unit from the 11th Division. It continued to be in use until December 1917. It was used again in October 1918 by the 2nd Battalion The London Scottish. There are 163 First World War burials, all of whom are identified. There is also a British concrete command post in the cemetery boundary, built by the 37th Division in July 1917.
  • Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Dikkebus (Dickebusch)

    50.81831599341681

    2.832898199558258

    The cemetery was in use from February 1915 to May 1917. Burials were also made in March and April 1918. There are 624 burials, 8 of whom are unidentified.
  • Dickebusch New Military Cemetery Extension, Dikkebus (Dickebusch)

    50.81832954997599

    2.832222282886505

    The extension contains 547 burials, including 5 unidentified, dating from May 1917 to January 1918.
  • Dickebusch Old Military Cemetery, Dikkebus (Dickebusch)

    50.819292507487745

    2.8332294523715973

    The cemetery was in use from January to March 1915. There are 46 First World War burials and 10 burials for Second World War casualties dating from late May 1940.
  • Divisional Cemetery, Dickebusch Rd, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.84831041423921

    2.8581002354621887

    The cemetery was started at the end of April 1915 and was used until May 1916. The cemetery was used in July 1917 during the British offensive in the summer of 1917. There are 283 burials in the cemetery, 277 of whom are identified. There is a row of graves for 23 casualties from 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment. They were killed during the German gas attack at Hill 60 on 5th May 1915. Many of the casualties from the July 1917 burials are gunners from the artillery units which were based in the vicinity at that time.
  • Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery and Extension, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.87429472779811

    2.893998920917511

    The cemetery was started by field ambulance units of 48th (South Midland) and 58th (London) Divisions in August 1917. It was used until January 1918. During the years 1924 to 1926 graves from the surrounding area were brought in to the cemetery, which originally contained 86 burials. The cemetery comprises an original site of 88 graves in Plot I rows B to E. The extension of the cemetery after the war in the 1920s comprises Plot I rows F to S and all of the graves in Plot II. The total number of burials is 676, and 253 of these are identified.
  • Dochy Farm New British Cemetery, Langemark (Langemarck)

    50.88148317219457

    2.971903681755066

    The location of the cemetery was ground captured by the 4th New Zealand Brigade during the Battle of Broodseinde on 4th October 1917, which was one of the battles within the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). The cemetery was created after the Armistice when graves from the surrounding area were brought together. There are 1,439 burials and commemorations. Of the total number of burials 481 are identified.
  • Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Westvleteren

    50.89235985867267

    2.702910304069519

    Three Casualty Clearing Stations (C.S.S.) - the 4th, 47th and 61st - were set up in this location from July 1917 to care for casualties from the 1917 British summer offensive which would become the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). The cemetery was continually in use until early 1918. The number of burials for the First World War casualties totals 3,174. There are 65 German graves. Also there are 74 Second World War burials dating from May 1940.
  • Dragoon Camp Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.89555030022665

    2.8816191852092743

    The cemetery was originally called Villa Gretchen Cemetery. It is located near to a building called Villa Gretchen and a building called Dragoon House by British forces. It was started on 9th August by the 13th Royal Welch Fusiliers. The area had been captured by the 38th (Welsh) Division on 31st July 1917 at the start of the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). It was used until October 1917. There are 66 First World War burials in the cemetery, 10 of whom are unidentified.
  • Dranouter Churchyard, Dranouter (Dranoutre)

    50.76620263643071

    2.783014476299286

    The village of Dranouter was occupied by the British 1st Cavalry Division on 14th October 1914. The cemetery was used from October 1914 to July 1915. It remained in Allied territory until the German advance during the German spring offensive in April 1918. The village was recaptured by the British 30th Division on 30th August 1918. There are 79 Commonwealth burials in Dranouter Churchyard, one of whom is unidentified.
  • Dranoutre Military Cemetery, Dranouter (Dranoutre)

    50.766820143974336

    2.7804341912269592

    The village of Dranouter was occupied by the British 1st Cavalry Division on 14th October 1914. The cemetery was started after July 1915 when the Dranoutre Churchyard cemetery was closed. It was used until March 1918 when the German forces captured the village. The ground was recaptured in the autumn of 1918 and the cemetery was used again in September and October 1918. There are 456 Commonwealth burials in Dranouter Military Cemetery, two of whom are unidentified. One German war grave is located in the cemetery.
  • Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.864121464173536

    2.8778520226478577

    This was the location of an Advanced Dressing Station (A.D.S.). The cemetery was started in July 1917. The cemetery was enlarged when graves from small burial sites and individual graves were brought to the cemetery to be reinterred. There are 1,544 burials in the cemetery, 1,368 of whom are identified. There are 57 graves of other nationalities. There is one Second World War burial dating from May 1940.
  • Elzenwalle Brasserie, Vormezele (Voormezeele)

    50.81083895144744

    2.859371602535248

    The cemetery was named after a brewery which was located opposite to the cemetery. It is a collection of small burial grounds, where the rows of graves vary from one to fourteeen. The cemetery was used between February 1915 and November 1917. There are 149 First World War burials in the cemetery.
  • Essex Farm Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.87124715705033

    2.872726321220398

    Essex Farm Cemetery

    There are 1,200 WW1 servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 103 of the burials are unidentified but memorials commemorate 19 casualties known or believed to be buried among them.

    “In Flanders Fields the Poppies Blow...”

    Essex Farm Cemetery is believed to have been the location where Major John McCrae, a Canadian doctor serving with the 1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery, wrote the draft of the poem “In Flanders Fields” on the evening of 2nd May 1915.

    “In Flanders Fields” Poem
  • Ferme-Olivier Cemetery, Elverdinge (Elverdinghe)

    50.88518662950687

    2.7990540862083435

    The cemetery was in use between 9th June and 5th August 1917. Several field ambulance units were located near to the cemetery: 62nd, 16th, 9th, 129th and 130th. The cemetery contains the graves of 408 First World War burials, two of whom are unidentified. There are three German war graves.
  • Godezonne Farm Cemetery, Kemmel

    50.80049588403491

    2.840488851070404

    The cemetery was used from February to May 1915 by 2nd Battalion Royal Scots and 4th Battalion Middlesex. Three casualties were buried here in 1916. After the war graves were brought into the cemetery from small burial sites in the area near Kemmel. There are now 79 First World War burials. 44 of the burials are unidentified.
  • Grootebeek British Cemetery, Reninghelst

    50.82609003405873

    2.782182991504669

    The village of Reninghelst was in Allied territory for the duration of the First World War. The cemetery was started by field ambulance and fighting units in April 1918. It was originally called Ouderdom Military Cemetery, after the hamlet of Ouderdom where it is located. The name Grootebeek Cemetery comes from the stream the Grootebeek or Groote Kemmelbeek which runs through the site. There are 109 burials and commemorations at the cemetery. There are two Second World War burials in the cemetery.

    Private John Lynn, VC, DCM

    Private Lynn is commemorated on a special memorial in the cemetery. He was orginally buried in Vlamertinghe Churchyard but his grave was destroyed. He was serving with the 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers during the Second Battle of Ypres. He was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his courage in the face of an enemy gas attack on 2nd May 1915.

  • Gunners’ Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.718490825878895

    2.8961393237113953

    The cemetery was named after a farm called Gunners Farm, which was located on the opposite side of the road. The cemetery was used by 9th Battalion Essex Regiment and 7th Battalion Suffolk Regiment from July 1915. Graves also included servicmen from 9th Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 11th Lancashire Fusiliers and 9th (Scottish) Division, the Royal West Kent Regiment and the Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment. The ground was captured by German forces following the German spring offensive in April 1918 but was recaptured in September 1918. There are 175 Commonwealth and 4 German burials in the cemetery.
  • Gwalia Cemetery, Poperinghe

    50.876312189452655

    2.764330208301544

    The cemetery was started in July 1917. It was used by infantry, artillery and field ambulance units until September 1918. There are 467 Commonwealth burials in the cemetery.
  • Hagle Dump Cemetery, Elverdinge (Elverdinghe)

    50.8614693928129

    2.7816814184188843

    The cemetery was started in April 1918. It was named after a stores dump which was located close to the cemetery. It continued to be used until October 1918. After the Armistice over 200 graves were brought into the cemetery from small burial sites and individual graves in the surrounding area. 20 graves were brought in from Brielen Military Cemetery. There are 437 burials, of which 299 are identified.
  • Hedge Row Trench Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.81942298647796

    2.9138486087322235

    The cemetery was started in March 1915 and was used until August 1917. It was also known as Ravine Wood Cemetery. The cemetery was badly damaged by artillery shelling after that time and the burials known to be buried in the cemetery were also damaged. For this reason the headstones have been arranged in a circle around the Cross of Sacrifice. There are 98 First World War burials, two of whom are unidentified.
  • Hooge Crater Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.84533385624355

    2.942909002304077

    The cemetery was started in October 1917 by 7th Division. By the end of the war there were 76 burials (Rows A to D of Plot I). After the war graves were brought in from small burial plots and other burial sites including Bass Wood Cemeteries Nos. 1 and 2, Zillebeke (48 burials); Koelenberg German Cemeteries, Gheluwe (10 burials); K.O.S.B Cemetery, Gheluwe (18 burials); La Chapelle Farm, Zillebeke (17 burials); Menin Road Pillbox Cemetery, Zillebeke (20 burials); Nieuwe Kruiseecke Cabaret Cemetery, Gheluvelt (22 burials); Pillbox Cemetery, Zonnebeke (63 burials); Sanctuary Wood Old British Cemetery, Zillebeke (54 burials); Tower Hamlets Cemetery, Gheluvelt (36 burials); Westhoek Ridge Small Cemetery, Zonnebeke (22 burials). There are 5,923 burials in the cemetery, of whom 2,344 are identified.
  • Houthulst Belgian Military Cemetery, Houthulst Forest

    50.966405343716204

    2.9485684633255005

    The cemetery contains 1,855 Belgian, 146 French and 81 Italian graves. Almost all the Belgian casualties were killed in September and October 1918.
  • Hop Store Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.855026278365166

    2.8088924288749695

    The cemetery was started in May 1915 during the Second Battle of Ypres. The hop store building on the old Vlamertinghe-Poperinghe road was used by field ambulance units. There are 251 burials in the cemetery, all of whom are identified.
  • Hospital Farm Cemetery, Elverdinge (Elverdinghe)

    50.869765275969584

    2.7991560101509094

    The cemetery is located at a farm which was used as a dressing station and named Hospital Farm by the British forces. The cemetery was used in 1915 and 1917. There are 115 Commonwealth burials and one Belgian war grave.
  • The Huts Cemetery, Dickebus (Dickebusch)

    50.82319858553947

    2.8203803300857544

    The cemetery was in the rear areas behind the British Front Line until April 1918 when the German spring offensive advanced close to the east of Dickebusch village. The cemetery was used between July and November 1917 during the British summer offensive that was the Third Battle of Ypres (Battle of Passchendaele). The field ambulance units were based in the vicinity and there was a row of huts along the Dickebusch-Brandhoek road used by the medical units from this time. The row of nearby huts was the reason that the cemetery became known as “The Huts”. There are 1,094 burials in the cemetery, all of whom are identified. Many of the casualties are gunners from the artillery positions located in the vicinity.
  • Hyde Park Corner (Royal Berks) Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.73772397359186

    2.8827068209648132

    Hyde Park Corner (Royal Berks) Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    There are 83 burials from the First World War, four of which are Gerrman military graves.
  • Irish House Cemetery, Kemmel

    50.78433428443312

    2.8538569808006287

    The name of the cemetery is taken from a farm near to it called Irish House by the British troops. The cemetery was started in June 1916 when the 16th (Irish) Division was in the vicinity. It was in use until September 1918. The ground was captured by the German forces between April to end of August 1918. There are 117 Commonwealth burials and commemorations in the cemetery, 77 of whom are identified.
  • Kandahar Farm Cemetery

    50.75476279672419

    2.847685217857361

    There are 443 First World War burials in the cemetery.
  • Kemmel Chateau Cemetery

    50.786347950555815

    2.8292423486709595

    The cemtery was started in the grounds of the chateau in December 1914. It was in use until March 1918. German forces occupied the village of Kemmel from April 1918 when the cemetery and the chateau were damaged. There are 1,135 First World War burials in the cemetery and 21 Second World War burials dating from May 1940.
  • Kemmel Churchyard

    50.78408036550878

    2.826392501592636

    The cemetery was used for burials from October 1914 to March 1915. There are 25 First World War burials and commemorations in the churchyard.
  • Kemmel No. 1 French Cemetery

    50.80513376675681

    2.8405585885047913

    The cemetery is believed to have originated from the period of fighting in this area from April 1918 when the German spring offensive made an advance capturing Kemmel village. After the war there were British, French and German burials here. The French graves were removed to the French ossuary at Le-Mont Kemmel and to the French cemetery Saint-Charles-de-Potyze north-west of Ypres. There are no 296 Commonwealth burials and 260 of these are unidentified. There are 94 German graves, most of whom are unidentified.
  • Kezelberg Military Cemetery, Moorsele

    50.83312079990242

    3.123338520526886

    The cemetery dates from the autumn battles of 1918 when the German army was being pushed eastwards away from Ypres. The 15th Royal Irish Rifles captured Moorsele village on 14th October. There are 147 First World War burials and 14 German war graves.
  • Klein-Vierstraat British Cemetery, Kemmel

    50.80510574196125

    2.8390055894851685

    The cemetery was started in January 1917. It was used until mid January 1918. After the Armistice graves were brought into the cemetery and now there are 804 First World War burials. 109 burials are unidentified.
  • La Belle Alliance Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.87329149329011

    2.8935469686985016

    The cemetery was made in February and March 1916 by the 10th and 11th King's Royal Rifle Corps. It was used again in July and August 1917. The name is taken from the name of a farmhouse “La Belle Alliance” which was located near to the cemetery. There are 60 burials in the cemetery, 10 of which are unidentified.
  • La Brique Military Cemetery No. 1, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.86453498319218

    2.8948156535625458

    The name La Brique comes from the hamlet that was named after the brickworkds that was here before the First World War. La Brique cemetery no. 1 was started in May 1915 and open until December 1915. There are 91 burials, of which 4 are unidentified.
  • La Brique Military Cemetery No. 2, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.864876946209556

    2.894233614206314

    The name La Brique comes from the hamlet that was named after the brickworkds that was here before the First World War. The cemetery no. 2, on the opposite side of the road to La Brique cemetery no. 1, was started in February 1915 and used until March 1918. At the time of the Armistice there were 383 burials here. More graves were brought in after the war and now there are 840 burials and commemorations in this cemetery, of which 400 are unidentified.
  • La Clytte Military Cemetery, De Klijte

    50.80146768515165

    2.799878865480423

    The cemetery was started on 1st November 1914 and was in use until April 1918. La Clytte (now known by its Flemish name of De Klijte) was the location of a Brigade Headquarters. After the Armistice graves were brought to the cemetery from the surrounding area. There are now 1,082 burials and commemorations in the cemetery. 844 graves are identified.
  • La Laiterie Military Cemetery, Kemmel

    50.791422203430486

    2.84134179353714

    The name of the cemetery comes from a dairy that was near to the burial site. The cemetery was started in November 1914 and used until October 1918. On 25th April the ground was captured by the German army but was retaken by Allied forces in September 1918. There are 751 burials in the cemetery, 180 of which are unidentified.
  • La Plus Douve Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.75290977224995

    2.864239811897278

    La Plus Douve farm was behind the Allied Front Line until May 1918 and was used as a battalion headquarters at times. The farm was also sometimes known as Ration Farm. The cemetery here was begun in April 1915 by 48th (South Midland) Division and was used until May 1918. At that time the ground was captured by the German advancing forces. There are 336 Commonwealth burials.
  • Lancashire Cottage Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.7290557726535

    2.8981027007102966

    The cemetery was started in November 1914 by 1st Battalion East Lancashre Regiment and 1st Battalion Hampshire Regiment. It continued to be used until March 1916. The cemetery was in German occupied territory between April and September 1918. There are 256 Commonwealth burials and 13 German war graves.
  • Langemarck German Cemetery, Langemark

    50.92019449871651

    2.9170753061771393

    Langemark German Cemetery

    The cemetery started as a small group of graves in 1915. Burials were increased here by the German military directorate in Gent during 1916 to 1918.

    During the 1930s approximately 10,000 soldiers were brought here from 18 German burial sites around the region of Langemarck and the total number of burials in the cemetery reached about 14,000. About 3,000 of the graves were those of the Student Volunteers who died in the Battle of Langemarck in October and November 1914. As a result of this the cemetery became known as the Student Cemetery - Der Studentenfriedhof. The total number of burials and commemorations in the cemetery is 44,294, of which 24,916 are unidentified remains.

  • Larch Wood (Railway Cutting) Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.82770545328306

    2.923538088798523

    The cemetery was begun in April 1915 near to a plantation of larch trees. It was also alongside the main gauge railway line to Ypres, hence the name Railway Cutting. It was in use until April 1918. After the Armistice graves were brought to the cemetery from the surrounding smaller burial sites. There are now 856 burials and commemorations in the cemetery, 536 of whom are identified.
  • Le Mont-Kemmel French Cemetery

    50.77901130821662

    2.8076760470867157

    Le Mont-Kemmel Cemetery

    The burial ground contains the remains of 5,237 unknown and 57 identified French soldiers.

  • Ledeghem Military Cemetery

    50.85751865763069

    3.12748521566391

    There are 85 First World War burials and commemorations in the cemetery.
  • Le Touquet Railway Crossing Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.71139185430552

    2.9118946194648743

    The cemetery was in use from October 1914 to June 1918. There are 74 First World War burials or commemorations in the cemetery. 24 of the burials are unidentified.
  • Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge (Poperinghe)

    50.82945138049399

    2.7013009786605835

    Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Poperinge

    The location of this cemetery was several miles west of the Front Lines and out of the range of the long-range German artillery. It was on the main communication route by rail from Poperinge to the French border and Hazebroek. The location of the old railway line is now the location of the N38 main road into Poperinge. Due to the location it was a suitable place for the safe placement of casualty clearing stations.

    Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery is the second largest Commonwealth cemetery in Belgium with a total of 10,755 burials and commemorations. Tyne Cot Cemetery near Passchendaele is the largest.

  • Lindenhoek Chalet Military Cemetery, Kemmel

    50.7765532931545

    2.823757231235504

  • Locre Hospice Cemetery, Loker

    50.77904522812438

    2.7803952991962433

  • Locre No. 10 Cemetery, Loker

    50.77178026601715

    2.7769312262535095

  • Loker Churchyard, Loker

    50.78257061610538

    2.772328555583954

  • London Rifle Brigade Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.72073577921847

    2.882084548473358

    The 4th Division began this cemetery in December 1914. The cemetery name is taken from 22 burials in Plot III of men of the London Rifle Brigade who died in January to March 1915. The cemetery was used until March 1918. It was in German occupied territory between April to September 1918. There are 335 Commonwealth burials and 18 German war graves.
  • Lone Tree Cemetery (Spanbroekmolen), Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.774520095153754

    2.8619344532489777

    There are 88 First World War burials in the cemetery, almost all of whom died on 7th June 1917, the first day of the Battle of Messines. Many of the casualties were serving with the Royal Irish Rifles when they were killed.

    The cemetery is located within a short walk of the water-filled mine crater of Spanbroekmolen, which is preserved as a memorial:

    Spanbroekmoelen Mine Crater Memorial — the Pool of Peace
  • Maple Copse Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.83547544618273

    2.9385772347450256

  • Maple Leaf Cemetery

    50.72094883477355

    2.838887572288513

    There are 167 First World War Commonwealth and 9 German burials in the cemetery.
  • Menin Road South Military Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.84954912307188

    2.904687523841858

  • Messines Ridge British Cemetery, Mesen (Messines)

    50.76430505035548

    2.891051173210144

  • Menen Communal Cemetery, Menen (Menin)

    50.800809950120524

    3.11243399977684

    There are 14 First World War Commonwealth burials in the cemetery. These burials are for men who died when they were prisoners of war in 1916-1917.
  • Menen German Military Cemetery, Menen (Menin)

    50.809605090576255

    3.1515124440193176

    There are 47,864 First World War German burials in the cemetery. The burials were begun in 1917. After the war the remains of 6,340 German military dead had been laid to rest in the cemetery. Between 1955 and 1959 burials in 49 German burial sites were brought into this cemetery from the southern province of Belgian Flanders.
  • Minty Farm Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.890885416656886

    2.908858358860016

  • Motor Car Corner Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.70958172758667

    2.892913967370987

  • Mud Corner British Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.74215127852052

    2.8984151780605316

  • Nieuwkerke (Neuve Église) Churchyard

    50.746142781697124

    2.8260478377342224

  • New Irish Farm Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.87314107964571

    2.897418737411499

  • Nine Elms British Cemetery, Poperinghe

    50.85040080100213

    2.697046995162964

  • No Man’s Cot Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.88383673151454

    2.89333239197731

  • Oak Dump Cemetery, Voormezele (Voormezeele)

    50.813662471962886

    2.909609377384186

  • Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.79367971171935

    2.901737093925476

  • Oxford Road Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.86888415957662

    2.9165321588516235

  • Packhorse Farm Shrine Cemetery, Wulvergem (Wulverghem)

    50.770145044495614

    2.833246886730194

  • Passchendaele New Military Cemetery, Passendale (Passchendaele)

    50.90468189596747

    3.0104416608810425

  • Perth Cemetery (China Wall), Zillebeke

    50.84217870510394

    2.921692728996277

  • Ploegsteert Wood Military Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.737016905881134

    2.900063395500183

  • Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Poelkapelle (Poelcapelle)

    50.92014399806935

    2.971597909927368

  • Polygon Wood Cemetery, Zonnebeke

    50.8574881809713

    2.9904726147651672

    The cemetery was made between August 1917 and April 1918. It was used again in September 1918. There are 107 First World War Commonwealth burials. 19 of these are unidentified. 60 of these casualties were serving with the New Zealand forces. There is one German burial in the cemetery.
  • Pond Farm Cemetery, Wulvergem (Wulverghem)

    50.768932953384365

    2.844981551170349

  • Poperinghe New Military Cemetery

    50.847340829570626

    2.733444571495056

  • Poperinghe Old Military Cemetery

    50.85072864313459

    2.728029191493988

  • Potijze Burial Ground, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.85999307017544

    2.9101699590682983

  • Potijze Château Grounds, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.86135426841609

    2.9157382249832153

  • Potijze Château Lawn Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.86125268782989

    2.9151588678359985

  • Potijze Château Wood Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.861543884918206

    2.9132920503616333

  • Prowse Point Military Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.74388207301765

    2.8986820578575134

  • R.E. Farm Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.76709496613937

    2.8602835536003113

    The cemetery takes its name from the Ferme des Douze Bonniers, which was called “R. E. Farm” by the British forces. It was behind the Allied line until April 1918, the time of the German spring offensive. The burials were started here by the 1st Battalion The Dorsetshire Regiment. They created two sites, cemetery no. 1 on the east side of the farm and cemetery no. 2 on the west side of the farm. The 23 graves in cemetery no. 1 were moved into no. 2 cemetery after the war. There are 179 First World War burials in the cemetery. 11 of the graves are unidentified.
  • R.E. Grave, Railway Wood, Zillebeke

    50.85215445884354

    2.936946451663971

  • Railway Château Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.8532589562643

    2.857157438993454

  • Railway Dugouts Burial Ground (Transport Farm), Zillebeke

    50.83498329541748

    2.9021018743515015

  • Ramparts Cemetery (Lille Gate), Ieper (Ypres)

    50.84457997694203

    2.889317125082016

    Ramparts Cemetery

    The cemetery is located on the ramparts of Ypres, close to the Lille Gate (Rijselpoort).

  • Ration Farm (La Plus Douve) Annexe, Ploegsteert

    50.75424106121962

    2.8635773062705994

    The cemetery was begun in January 1915 and used until January 1918. There are 202 First World War burials.
  • Red Farm Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.85489420563902

    2.780520021915436

  • Reninghelst Churchyard Extension

    50.81682011590113

    2.7645809948444366

  • Reninghelst New Military Cemetery

    50.81665099209808

    2.7595800161361694

  • Ridge Wood Military Cemetery, Voormezele (Voormezeele)

    50.81119396290123

    2.8498846292495728

  • Rifle House Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.73566362451743

    2.9010142385959625

  • Ruisseau Farm Cemetery, Langemark (Langemarck)

    50.912077161101514

    2.899395525455475

  • Saint-Charles-de-Potyze, French Military Cemetery

    50.86323685522318

    2.9262739419937134

    Saint-Charles-de-Potyze cemetery

    There are 3,547 named military dead buried in the cemetery, including the remains of 609 soldiers in the ossuary.

  • Sanctuary Wood Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.83817958550599

    2.9440462589263916

  • Seaforth Cemetery, Cheddar Villa, Langemark (Langemarck)

    50.88015392608392

    2.9265770316123962

  • Solferino Farm Cemetery, Brielen

    50.87712366283557

    2.845185399055481

  • Somer Farm Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.790439228636416

    2.889821380376816

    The cemetery was started in June 1917 at the time of the Battle of Messines. This cemetery was also known as Somer Farm Cemetery No. 1. The 13 burials in Somer Farm Cemetery No. 2 were removed after the war and reinterred in Wytschaete Military Cemetery. The cemetery here was used until March 1918. It was used for burials again in October 1918. There are 91 First World War burials.
  • Spanbroekmolen British Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wijtschaete)

    50.77834647305784

    2.8671057522296906

    The name of the cemetery is taken from the nearby windmill named “Spanbroekmolen”. What remained of the windmill was located on the German Front Line until it was blown up by one of the huge mines at the start of the Battle of Messines on 7th June 1917. 58 First World War burials are contained in the cemetery, all killed on 7th and 8th June 1917. Six of the casualties are commemorated on special memorials as they are believed to have been buried in this cemetery but their graves were destroyed at some point. 43 of the casualties were serving with the Royal Irish Rifles when they died.

    The cemetery is located near to the water-filled mine crater of Spanbroekmolen, which is preserved as a memorial:

    Spanbroekmoelen Mine Crater Memorial — the Pool of Peace
  • Spoilbank Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.820270582698804

    2.899537682533264

  • St. Julien Dressing Station Cemetery, Sint Juliaan ( St. Julien)

    50.88779245598354

    2.935691177845001

  • St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.75684651317048

    2.8557103872299194

  • Strand Military Cemetery, Ploegsteert Wood

    50.732726287782356

    2.8808024525642395

  • Suffolk Cemetery, Vierstraat, Kemmel

    50.80333912799304

    2.8444786369800568

    The cemetery was started in March 1915 by 2nd Battalion the Suffolk Regiment. Some burials were made later in October 1918. There are 47 First World War burials, 8 of whom are unidentified.
  • Talana Farm Cemetery, Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.882834492140276

    2.862289845943451

  • Tancrez Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.70996173997358

    2.902061641216278

    There was a medical aid post in the farm by the cemetery. The cemetery was in use from December 1914 to March 1918. There are 333 Commonwealth burials and commemorations and two German war graves in the cemetery.
  • Toronto Avenue Cemetery, Warneton (Waasten)

    50.73916387821941

    2.900240421295166

  • Torreken Farm Cemetery No. 1, Wijtschate (Wijtschaete)

    50.782306060118394

    2.892223298549652

    There was originally more than one Torreken Farm Cemetery, hence the “No. 1” in it's name. It was started by 5th Dorset Regiment in June 1917 during the Battle of Messines. It continued to be in use until April 1918. There are 90 First World War Commonwealth burials and 14 German burials. One of the total of the 104 burials is an unidentified casualty.
  • Track “X” Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.87820647032938

    2.9115043580532074

  • Tuileries British Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.83977324453948

    2.9201464354991913

  • Tyne Cot Cemetery, Passendale (Passchendaele)

    50.88703779655649

    2.998020350933075

    Tyne Cot Cemetery

    Tyne Cot Cemetery is the resting place of nearly 12,000 soldiers of the Commonwealth Forces, the largest number of burials of any Commonwealth cemetery of either World War. Most of the burials are unidentified.

    The dates of death of the soldiers buried at Tyne Cot military cemetery cover four years, from October 1914 to September 1918 inclusive.

  • Underhill Farm Cemetery, Ploegsteert

    50.741098467950295

    2.869880497455597

  • Vlamertinghe Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.85588891855813

    2.820594906806946

  • Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Vlamertinge (Vlamertinghe)

    50.847605017426986

    2.8192108869552612

  • Voormezele Churchyard, Voormezele

    50.81674589131307

    2.876223921775818

    There is one First World War Commonwealth burial in the churchyard. Lieutenant E W Robinson of D Squadron of the 5th (Royal Irish) Lancers. He was killed on 25th October 1914 is commemorated on a special memorial, believed to have been buried in the cemetery at the time of his death.
  • Voormezeele Enclosures No. 1 & No. 2, Voormezele (Voormezeele)

    50.81753219167601

    2.8733378648757935

  • Voormezeele Enclosure No. 3, Voormezele (Voormezeele)

    50.818665073561604

    2.873673141002655

  • Welsh Cemetery (Caesar’s Nose), Boezinge (Boesinghe)

    50.88670829194006

    2.8819946944713593

  • Westhof Farm, Nieuwkerke (Neuve Église)

    50.73722196565289

    2.8054793179035187

  • Westoutre Churchyard & Extension, Westouter

    50.79794620855618

    2.7464666962623596

  • Westouter British Cemetery

    50.800241600837495

    2.7451899647712708

  • White House Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.86182830822559

    2.8989046812057495

  • Wieltje Farm Cemetery, Sint Jan (St. Jan)

    50.86891124332084

    2.9109209775924683

  • Woods Cemetery, Zillebeke

    50.82258611493287

    2.9154780507087708

    Woods Cemetery was begun in April 1915 by 1st Battalion the Dorset Regiment and 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment. It continued to be used until September 1917. There are 326 First World War burials including many Canadian casualties.
  • Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery, Wulvergem (Wulverghem)

    50.76367144891009

    2.843905985355377

    The cemetery was begun in December 1914 and was originally called Wulverghem Dressing Station Cemetery at that time. By the time of the Armistice there were 162 burials. After the war graves were brought into the cemetery from the surrounding area and other small burial sites. There are 1,010 casualties buried in the cemetery now, of whom 658 are identified.
  • Wytschaete Military Cemetery, Wijtschate (Wytschaete)

    50.78495064822872

    2.8768354654312134

    This cemetery was created after the end of the First World War, when the burials from a number of smaller burial grounds in the vicinity were brought to this location. The burial sites were: Rest and Be Thankful Farm, Kemmel (23 burials); R. E. (Beaver) Farm, Kemmel (22 burials); Cemetery near Rossignol Estaminet, Kemmel (18 burials); Somer Farm Cemetery No. 2, Wytschaete (13 burials); Gordon Cemetery, Kemmel (19 burials). The cemetery contains 1,002 burials of the First World War. 673 are unidentified, giving a total of 329 identified burials.
  • Ypres Reservoir Cemetery, Ieper (Ypres)

    50.853463845337515

    2.8774161636829376

    Ypres Reservoir Cemetery

    2,613 Commonwealth servicemen are now buried in this cemetery. 1,579 of the graves are identified with 1,034 graves containing the remains of unidentified burials.

  • Ypres Town Cemetery & Extension (Menin Gate), Ieper (Ypres)

    50.85388840876285

    2.8976574540138245

    The town cemetery was used from October 1914 when the British Army arrived in the area to May 1915. There are 145 war graves in plots located in amongst the civilian burials. The Extension was also started in October 1914 and was open until April 1915. After the Armistice more graves were brought into the Extension and there are now a total of 598 Commonwealth burials or commemorations in the Extension. There are also 43 Second World War burials in the Extension.
  • Zantvoorde British Cemetery, Zantvoorde (Zandvoorde)

    50.81371579973345

    2.9834693670272827

    The cemetery was created after the Armistice when the remains of soldiers from the surrounding area were brought to this place. There are 1,583 burials or commemorations in the cemetery. Only 449 of these are identified. There is one Second World War burial in the cemetery.
  • Zandvoorde Churchyard

    50.81322861676361

    2.980392873287201

    There are four Commonwealth burials in the churchyard. They are all cavalrymen of the 10th (Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars killed on 26th October 1914.

Related Topics

War Graves on the Western Front

An article providing background to the burial of military dead from the 1914-1918 war and why so many of the casualties are still recorded as “Missing”:

War Graves for WW1 Dead on The Western Front

Registers for WW1 Military Burials and Commemorations

For information about the organizations which are responsible for the maintenance of graves and memorials to servicemen and women go to:

War Grave Agencies

German WW1 Burials in Belgium

An article explaining why the remains of German soldiers, buried across 678 districts of Belgium, were exhumed and reintered in collecting cemeteries for German war dead on Belgian soil.

German WW1 Military Burials in Belgium

Monuments and Memorials of the Ypres Salient

There are many monuments and memorials, both official and private, in the Ypres Salient battlefields. They range from small memorials in memory of an individual person to official memorials commemorating many thousands of servicemen who fell in action and who have no known grave.

Monuments and Memorials of the Ypres Salient

Related Reading

Cover for book title Empires of the Dead

Empires of the Dead

by David Crane

A new book published in 2013 telling the fascinating story of Fabian Ware and his vision for the building of the First World War cemeteries. Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson prize for non-fiction.

304 pages. Published by William Collins (26 Sep 2013). ISBN-10: 0007456654. ISBN-13: 978-0007456659

Book - Silent Cities: An Illustrated Guide to the War Cemeteries & Memorials to the Missing in France & Flanders 1914-1918

The Silent Cities

An Illustrated Guide to the War Cemeteries & Memorials to the Missing in France & Flanders 1914-1918 by Sidney C. Hurst

Book - Remembered

Remembered

The History of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission by Julie Summers, Brian Harris and Ian Hislop

Features images by award winning photographer Brian Harris, never before seen photographs from the Commission's own archives and a new history of the Commission by renowned author Julie Summers.

Book - On Fame's Eternal Camping Ground

On Fame's Eternal Camping Ground

A Study of First World War Epitaphs in the British Cemeteries of the Western Front by Trefor Jones

Based on five years' research, this book presents more than 1,500 epitaphs on First World War headstones in the cemeteries of Belgium and France. These tributes to young sons, husbands and brothers of that lost generation, buried far from home, provide an eloquent and moving demonstration of the power and beauty of language.

Book - Lutyens and the Great War

Lutyens and the Great War

by Tim Skelton & Gerald Gliddon

Sir Edwin Lutyens did many works in connection with the the First World War; Thiepval memorial on the Somme for example. This book describes the variety of these moving works and the stories behind them.

Book - The Unending Vigil

The Unending Vigil

This book by Philip Longworth tells the Commission's story from its beginnings on the Western Front during the First World War under the direction of Fabian Ware, describing the contribution made by the architects, sculptors, engineers, horticulturalists and men of letters who combined to create the war cemeteries and memorials that are so familiar today.

Acknowledgements

Atlas de Nécropole: Ministère des Anciens Combattants et Victimes de Guerre, 37, rue de Bellechasse, 75 007 Paris, La Documentation Française, 1994, ISBN: 2-11-002737-1

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission: Information about the origin and number of burials in the British and Commonwealth military cemeteries listed here is based on information provided in the cemetery registers produced by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Photographs marked with “CWGC” are used with the kind permission of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.